Posts Tagged ‘drumming’

DRUMMERSRULE! Drum School 101 – For Ages 10-100

These Drum Lessons are perfect for anyone ages 10 – 100 that are interested in learning to play the drums. In this 4 week Course you will begin to build the necessary coordination and skills to play the drum set. You will also learn how to read and play drum notation and play along to various songs.

These are GROUP CLASSES and last 60 minutes long. They are taught in our ELECTRIC DRUM STUDIO. The Studio has 4 top of the line Roland electric kits for students to use. This 101 Class is very unique, it enables the student to learn faster and retain more while having fun. The Group Classes are affordable, and a great way to see if you, or your child, has what it takes to become a drummer.

NEXT AVAILABLE COURSE:
Saturday, January 9th – Saturday, January 30th 3:00pm – 4:00pm
Price = $95.00 (Price Includes Drumsticks and Binder)
Meets EVERY Saturday for 4 weeks

Students must be registered prior to the start of the first class. New students will not be accepted once the first class has started.

Click here to ENROLL YOURSELF ONLINE!

Look forward to seeing you in class! Call with any questions 602-769-2075.

DRUMMERSRULE! DRUM SCHOOL
3723 W. Monte Cristo Avenue
Phoenix, AZ 85053
http://followus.com/drummersrule

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3/4 Ostinato Pattern by Brett Frederickson

A simple 3/4 Ostinato pattern. This is a great exercise to use in developing a solo in 3/4. Enjoy!

Ostinato Pattern Page 1

Ostinato Pattern Page 2

Mr. BrettDrummersrule

Brett Frederickson – DrummersRule! Drum Lessons

twitter : https://twitter.com/drummerbrett

facebook : https://www.facebook.com/drummersrule

google+ : https://www.google.com/+BrettFrederickson

BRETT’s DRUMMING TIPS – “HABITS”

A word from Mr. Brett:

As your instructor, teacher and friend, I have your best interests in mind. I give advice to assist you in developing the skills and tools required for a well-rounded musical development. I understand what you need to be successful. drum-lessons-in-phoenix-2Unfortunately, at times, some students become preoccupied with learning “Impressive Patterns or Solos” to the point that they neglect to practice the actual lesson. Remember, these “Impressive Patterns/ Solos” that are here today and gone tomorrow, will do you absolutely no good, unless you have taken the time and effort to develop the tools essential to excellent drumming technique. Whether you are beginning an entry level of instruction, intermediate level, or advanced level, my goal is to provide instruction that will help you develop as a “well-rounded” better performer. Below are a few “HABIT” tips to assist you as a drummer, enjoy!!

  • DAILY SESSION HABIT – The most effective way of developing long-lasting skills and expanding your techniques is through daily sessions. “Practice marathons” and “drum bursts” (15 min sessions on your set) in addition to your drum lessons will go a long way in getting you the results you desire. Remember, when walking by your drum set. Stop, sit down, and practice for 5 – 15 minutes. Also, don’t forget the other styles you’ve worked on in the past. Go back to these styles, pull out your sheets and include them when you practice.
  • GAME HABIT – Playing repetitive “hand” or “foot-technique” exercises or reading-skills exercises are enjoyable when you understand they are guaranteed (when practiced correctly) to improve you performance. First of all, make a sort of game out of the whole idea, by making everything you play, including “hand-technique” and reading exercises, sound as musical as possible by utilizing dynamics, articulation, and musicality to its highest level. Practice as if you are preparing for a performance, or playing in front of a live audience.Drummersrule
  • CHALLENGE HABIT – Once you have encountered a “challenge” (Ex. Dynamics, executing a phrase at the suggested tempo, articulation of a particular rhythm, phrasing etc.) Simply divide this “challenging” section of the music into smaller musical phrases and begin working on improving these “challenge” sections separately. Slow down the tempo and repeat theses sections until you can play them both relaxed & “naturally”. Then, follow this habit by putting these “extracted phrases” back into context, in order to facilitate “musical-continuity”. Ultimately everything you perform will be relaxed and “natural” both to you and your audience.
  • PARENTAL HABIT – Let me take this opportunity to encourage you to get involved with your younger children. They really need your help and guidance to motivate them in developing the “Habit of Practicing”… which mentioned above is one of the keys to their success!
  • NETWORKING HABIT – There’s an old saying; “Out of sight, out of mind”. Well, this is one of the truest things ever written and it so applies to the music business and drums as well. If you want to work, you need to be seen playing your drums, go out to the venues, jam sessions, put on a small workshop, get to know the employees of the local music stores, visit clubs where drummers are needed, ask, ask, ask! The goal is to “BE SEEN”! You need to engage in conversation with the guys who book gigs and potential employers. Let them know that you’re qualified.
  • For younger players still in school; if you want that specific chair or jazz band seat you have to 
work hard, yes. But also make sure that you’re on a first name basis with the bandleader, drum captain, and any private instructors or helpers, because they will often be assisting with the auditioning process.

Bonus Tip – Top 5 Drummer Networking Mistakes:


  • Not acting professional enough
  • Not being prepared
  • Not letting them know in some way that you’re qualified for the job
  • Not following up on potential leads or opportunities
  • Not having business cards (pro players)
  • ADVICE HABIT– Always, consistently, without fail, reach out to me when you have questions! So many students feel their question is not worth bothering me over. I think the opposite, EVERY question is important!! Ask me please… Email me at brett@drummersrule.net or for that matter pick up the phone and simply Call or Text me at 602-769-2075. It’s that simple!!!

Following the above advice will definitely help you succeed, and after all, that’s what it’s all about. Let me now your comments and questions. Enjoy your week!

Mr. Brett

Brett Frederickson – DrummersRule! Drum Lessons

twitter : https://twitter.com/drummerbrett

facebook : https://www.facebook.com/drummersrule

google+ : https://www.google.com/+BrettFrederickson

This video features very talented young drummers from Chicago showing what they have… enjoy!

 

Brett Frederickson – DrummersRule! Drum LessonsDrummersrule

twitter : https://twitter.com/drummerbrett
facebook : https://www.facebook.com/drummersrule
google+ : https://www.google.com/+BrettFrederickson

cymbals2 drummersrule

7 Things to Consider When Buying Cymbals

Choosing ride cymbals is very important for drummers. I’ve noticed that many young drummers who ask me about certain ride cymbals are usually not taking into consideration the music they will be playing. The sound you get from the cymbals and drums is very important and it mainly depends on your touch, but choosing the right equipment is the first step in giving yourself the best instrument to work with.

Many young drummers who are just starting out are not aware how essential it is to use the appropriate cymbal. Overall, cymbals tend to be loud to begin with, especially if they are not played with a mature touch. I find it harder to find a cymbal that has a nice sound and doesn’t get too loud as I play it than a cymbal that isn’t loud enough. I generally use relatively dark rides when playing acoustic jazz and rides that are a bit brighter when playing electric jazz. When I play with acoustic instrumentalist in a cymbals drummersrulesmall room or club setting, I find that the lightest flat rides gave me the airy sound needed to blend with and not overpower the other players.

If you have at least a few different ride cymbals and additional cymbals sounds (crashes, splashes, etc.), you can make choices depending on the musical situations you find yourself in.

Do not settle for what everyone else thinks is the best. listen for yourself, and make your own mind up. There is nothing wrong with taking suggestions, but people have their own preferences and favorites. It all comes down to what your ears say they like. try matching cymbals with other cymbals by ear.

Below are Seven (7) things to consider when buying cymbals:

1. Cymbal Types The main types of cymbals are hi-hats, rides, and crashes. Experts recommend you buy them in that order as you can more blend the other cymbals more easily with your hi-hat once you’ve chosen it. These will be used for the core of your play, but you can also add special effects cymbals, such as Splash or Chinese cymbals, for accent sounds.

2. Size Through the various types of cymbals, you can find ones that are anywhere from 4″ to 30″. And size matters. Smaller cymbals are quieter, they respond quicker and have less sustain. Their sound is tighter and higher in pitch. Larger cymbals are lower pitched and have a slower response; they’re also are louder, have a bigger sound and a longer sustain.

3. Cast or Sheet? Generally considered a “superior” cymbal, Cast cymbals are individually crafted from raw, molten metal. Once poured, they’re rolled, shaped, hammered and lathed. The lengthy process results in a full, complex sound favored by experts and professionals. Because of its individual creation, each Cast cymbal has its own unique sonic makeup, which many say improves with age.

Sheet cymbals are cut from large sheets of metal. As a result, they’re less expensive — but that doesn’t always translate to poorer quality. Sheet cymbals are uniform in thickness and composition, resulting in a more uniform sound from all the cymbals within the same model. They can crack more easily if heavily played.

cymbals3 drummersrule

7 things to consider when buying cymbals

4. Alloy Variations All cymbals are a bronze variation of tin and copper. The most basic, and many starter cymbals, is the B8 (made of 8 percent tin and 92 percent copper). It produces a bright albeit almost brittle sound. At the other end, a B20 bronze is found (20 percent tin, 80 percent copper), which has a warmer and more musical quality. In between the two, you can also find B10, B12 and B15 bronzes.

5. Softer Play Playing jazz and other acoustic music is done with a lighter touch, from sticks or brushes. Volume isn’t as important as obtaining the darker and more complex sounds that thinner and lighter cymbals offer. If aiming for jazz play, focus on getting a good ride and set of hi-hats first. The ride should be medium thin to thin and around 20″ to 24″. A starter set of thin hi-hats should be 14″ or 15″ in diameter.

6. Heavy Play Rock or heavy metal drummers hit harder, so durability is more important. You’ll want a brighter, louder sound that cuts through the mix and can get it through a variety of hi-hats, rides and crashes. Go for medium to heavy cymbals that are quite thick — these will have a higher pitch and vibrate less.

7. Test Them Out Head to a store if possible to bang a few cymbals before buying them. Take your own sticks, and hit the cymbal with a glancing blow, from one side to the other. Not straight on or on an edge. And hit them as you would when you play, not just with a light touch. Try them in different areas of the store if you can, because the surroundings will have an effect on the sound. Another idea is to go to Zildjian.com, where you can listen to the sound of each cymbal. Note, the exact sound may vary, but it will give you a good idea when looking for the sound you want.

Learn How to Play a 12/8 Double Paradiddle and Nanigo Groove.